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Old Type Writer: Conversations in motion

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By Roy Sexton 

"Oh, I went to the emergency room last night. They took me from the veterinarian's in an ambulance. The EMS boy looked like Aquaman." - Susie Duncan Sexton 

Wait. What?! So began a phone call with my mother about a month ago. To clarify a few things: no, she does not receive her health care AT the veterinarian BUT got light-headed while she was there and, then ... nearly passed out. And, no, Jason Momoa is not moonlighting for Whitley County EMS, but my mom is threatening to call 911 again, just so she can hang with the young man who apparently bears a striking resemblance to Game of Thrones' Khal Drogo

My mom has gone through a battery of tests over the past month, and the good news is that her exuberance for life and her candor and her irreverence have apparently served her well physically in that an army of doctors have found no issues of concern. As my mother notes, "I don't want to go into that medical world if I don't have to." Who can blame her? I do wish she wouldn't have such a propensity to read and believe all of the side effects listed on any and all medications, but, hell, that wariness has likely served her quite well in this pharmacologically reckless culture. 

What my mother has learned from this experience is that when others don't listen or behave like outright jackholes, it can cause her to experience justified exasperation to the point of plummeting-elevator-wooziness. I think too many of us are still trying to learnthat lesson. 

"At 46, I'm coming to the realization that I want life to be less about 'stuff.' I've had so much fun collecting and gathering and accumulating, but now it all just feels like a weight around my neck." - Roy Sexton 

Two weekends ago, I went to visit my parents. After her chance encounter with a hunky Momoa-look-alike, life flashed before my mother's eyes, and she wanted to call a family meeting to discuss our "plan." Note: we are NOT a "family meeting" kind of family, and we might have "plans" but for some reason we don't actually share them. We are more of a "something unanticipated just happened so let's light our hair on fire" kind of family. My mother has always been the one who says the things that need to be said but aren't always heard. This time, it felt like my father and I stopped being idiots long enough to listen. I was cautiously optimistic that we might talk about what the future could hold. And, then ... 

"I'm getting up at 10 am tomorrow to take the LaCrosse in to trade for an Impala." - Don Sexton

Unclear if that was invitation for me to assist in the car-buying process or not, but I volunteered to tagalong on a task that has pretty much eluded me my entire adult life. I inherited a hand-me-down Buick Century from my grandmother when I was in college. My parents were kind enough to buy me a Honda Civic when I was in graduate school. Then, I was wise enough to marry an automotive engineer, and I never set foot in an auto dealership again. 

My father used to call on auto dealers across northern Indiana in the late 80s when he was a lending officer for Merchants National Bank. He knows a thing or two about this world; the finer points of operating an iPad may befuddle him but he knows his Carfax from his Kelley Blue Book. Nonetheless, the game of buying a car remains one rife with swaggering toxic masculinity. 

"I'm sorry. With whom am I negotiating on this? You or your dad or John," whined the auto salesman as I handed him my cell phone and asked him to work everything out with an auto engineer stationed at his home computer in Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

My father and I both gestured toward the phone and then promptly closed our traps. The best way to cut through toxic masculinity? Introduce a well-informed curve ball who doesn't cotton to preening peacocks. We walked out of there with a gently used Ford Fusion at a third of the expected price, paid in cash, leaving behind a small army of Dockers-wearing salesmen scratching their heads. 

"Good. I'm glad John got involved. He reminds me of me. When he gets to talk about what he loves, he's unstoppable." - Susie Sexton, upon our return. 

You see, all along, my mom had suggested their ancient Buick LaCrosse needed a retirement. My mom is the one saying, "Can we slow down and just take care of the things we love before time is completely gone?" My mom is the one urging people to live their best lives and to enjoy the moments they are in. My mom is the one asking for authentic conversation that isn't transmitted via digital device in tweets, texts, and cynical memes.

KNOCK! KNOCK! "We're at the door here for breakfast and swimming and to tell you our plan." - my parents at my hotel room door the last morning of my weekend visit. (I may have asked for them to call before heading over ... that didn't happen.) 

At some point in the past couple of years, my parents and I transitioned to that mid-stage milestone of the child (gleefully) staying at a hotel when he/she comes to visit said parents. It's not meant to be rude or controlling, but as one ages, as one becomes set in their ways, as one's midsection grows more pear-shaped ... the idea of retreating to a hotel room, collapsing in a heap, and breathing solitary air at the end of a day's family visit carries a touch of appeal. 

And my parents get to come use the pool like two 12-year-olds who've just run away from home. 

Here's the thing: those two 12-year-olds who these days spend as much time plotting each other's demise as they do reflecting wistfully on their 50 (!) years of wedded "bliss," came bounding into my room, speaking a mile a minute, finishing each other's sentences, sharing their "plan" with me. I was half awake and a little cranky, but their zeal was a tonic.

And that plan? It's a pretty good one. It's not for me to tell, but I feel good about the future. Possibly for the first time ever. You see, I have a vision of the fun we will have, reminiscent of those special days I lived at home and had nary a care in the world, other than what cartoons were airing on Saturday morning or passing an algebra test. And that vision is shared. That makes all the difference. 

 

Reel Roy Reviews is now TWO books! You can purchase your copies by clicking here (print and digital). In addition to online ordering at Amazon or from the publisher Open Books, the first book is currently is being carried by BookboundCommon Language Bookstore, and Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room in Ann Arbor, Michigan and by Green Brain Comics in Dearborn, Michigan. My mom Susie Duncan Sexton's Secrets of an Old Typewriter series is also available on Amazon and at Bookbound and Common Language.



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